Shine Some Light on LED Facials

Typically, when someone thinks of a facial, the first thing that comes to mind is peels, gels, and pricking. Now, there is a new form of skin treatment known as an LED facial. An LED facial, also known as Color Light Therapy, is a skin treatment that uses four clinically proven wavelengths of non-UV rays. The intended result is to boost collagen and treat stubborn acne.

According to Grace Gavilanes of InStyle, the process of an LED facial is similar to a regular one, with just a few more lights. First, the esthetician performing the facial must check the skin for sun damage. Then, they steam the face to open up the pores and wipe away any remnants of makeup and oil from the face.

After the face is prepped, that’s where the fun begins. The esthetician will bring out the beige machine, which is placed over the head and emits four different LED lights. Each light has a different wavelength and function for the skin. Here are the four different lights that are used for the skin treatment:

Infrared — This is used to accelerate skin recovery and regeneration.
Amber — This colored light helps build new collagen and elastin in the skin.
Blue — This one help to eliminate acne-causing bacteria that can plague the skin on the face.
Red — This light helps to reduce inflammation and promote circulation for an overall improvement in complexion.

Each light is turned on over the skin for a few minutes, giving it enough time to correct and clear the skin with its added benefits. The esthetician will usually extract whiteheads and blackheads before and after the treatment and finishes it off with a soothing mask to add hydration back into the skin. Most facials will end with a layer of moisturizer to ensure that the patient is leaving with healthy skin that feels good.

While it may not work for everyone, Gavilanes noticed a big difference after two days of her treatment. She said that the facial reminded her of sunbathing and left her complexion looking smoother and clearer.

Prices may vary, but a ball park figure is about $195 for 50 minutes and $125 for 30. So deciding to do this extravagant facial should be well thought out. However, the one-time experience seemed to be enough for Gavilanes, even though she did admit that if she could afford it she would go back.

If you want to try out a different kind of facial that will leave your skin glowing, then the LED treatment may be for you. Remember to do as much research as you can on it before you actually decide to get it done. It can be one of the experiences that changes your perspective on your skin forever.


Spa Versus At-Home Treatments:

Facials: Home all the way. Facials can be pretty expensive, usually ranging around $75, and most cannot afford them every month. There are a variety of products you can buy for $10 at the department store, as well as making your own face mask for a lower cost.

Waxing: While there are at-home products to buy, this should probably be left to the professionals. There are a variety of problems that could arise from doing it at home like spilled wax, burnt skin, swollen hair follicles, and more. A professional ensures a safe and satisfying result.

Mani/Pedi: Unless you want an intricate design you know you can’t do at home, painting your nails yourself will save a lot of money. The products you need are less expensive at the department store, about $10-$15 that lasts several uses, whereas professionals can be $20-$40 per session.


Daily Skin Care Routine:

Morning

  • Cleanser
  • Toner
  • Moisturizer
  • SPF

Night

  • Remove Make-up
  • Cleanser
  • Eye Cream
  • Moisturizer

Written by: Alex Dunn

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